Chapter Programs in a Box

Chapter Programs in a Box

 

Welcome to ONS Chapter Programs in A Box!  In today’s changing healthcare environment, it can be difficult for ONS Chapters to offer quality educational programming at a reasonable cost.  ONS understand this and has developed a series of educational programs that can be used by Chapters to present to their members free of charge.   

 

The programs were developed and reviewed by expert clinicians to ensure their quality and appropriateness to clinical practice.  Chapter leaders can select the program that they would like to use from the available offerings, download them for free, and secure a speaker of their choosing.  The speaker can then use the presentation materials (power point slides, speaker notes, and handouts) to conduct the presentation for the Chapter.   Chapters can also apply for free CNE hours through the ONS Approver Unit and step by step instructions are included in the materials available for download. 

 

For those chapters wishing to use available presentations:

  1. Review list of available programs below
  2. Download the presentation (powerpoint file) and accompanying handouts (pdf)
  3. Secure speaker and use materials to conduct presentation

For chapters wishing to apply for CNE credits for presentations downloaded as above:

  1. Download the general and program specific CNE application instructions (pdf)
  2. Download the accompanying templates for use with CNE application (word)
  3. Follow the instructions to submit online application to ONS Approver Unit

 

Questions about the Programs?  Contact educationcourses@ons.org.  Questions about the CNE application process?  Contact CEApprover@ons.org.

  

Programs:

  1. Distress in the Cancer Patient
  2. Updates and Controversies in Cancer Screening
  3. Cancer Survivorship and Care Planning 
  4. Combating Compassion Fatigue 
  5. Difficult Patient and Family Communication in Oncology 
  6. Developing Your Chapter Leadership
  7. Incorporating Physical Therapy into Cancer Care

1. Distress in Cancer Patients: Distress, an indicator of suffering and predictor of poor health and quality-of-life outcomes throughout the disease trajectory, is common and treatable. Emerging research suggests that screening for and addressing distress not only enhance quality of life but may also be associated with improved cancer outcomes. Unfortunately, distress often goes unrecognized in oncology care, necessitating the development of systematic methods for its identification and management.  The goal of this educational program is to present knowledge needed for nurses to assess, recognize, and manage distress in patients with cancer. 

Presentation Materials

Continuing Nurse Education Materials


2. Updates and Controversies in Cancer Screening: The American Cancer Society estimates that 1,660,290 people in the United States will be diagnosed with cancer in 2013, with another 580,350 dying of the disease (American Cancer Society, 2013). Efforts aimed at screening for cancer can lead to earlier detection, reduction in cancer morbidity, and an estimated 3% to 35% reduction in cancer mortality (National Cancer Institute, 2013). However, navigating the available cancer screening guidelines can be challenging, even for oncology nurses. The goal of this educational program is to present knowledge needed for nurses to interpret cancer screening guidelines and assist their patients in appropriate decision making when pursuing cancer screening.

Presentation Materials

Continuing Nurse Education Materials


3. Cancer Survivorship and Care Planning: The National Cancer Institute (NCI) estimates that there are nearly 13.7 million cancer survivors alive in the United States today with three-quarters of them being over 60 years of age. These numbers are expected to increase to 18 million by the year 2022.  Cancer survivors have complex needs and oncology nurses are in an unique position to advocate for and help empower them to improve the survivorship experience.  The goal of this educational program is to present knowledge needed for nurses to enhance the quality of cancer care delivered to cancer survivors and their caregivers. 

Presentation Materials

Continuing Nurse Education Materials


4. Combating Compassion Fatigue in Oncology Nursing: Very few nurses enter the field of oncology prepared for the emotional impact of their work with seriously ill patients and their families.  This can lead to compassion fatigue (CF), which can have vast impact on a nurse’s personal and professional lives.  The goal of this educational program is to present knowledge needed for nurses to assess, recognize, manage, and prevent compassion fatigue in themselves and their fellow nurses.

Presentation Materials

Continuing Nurse Education Materials


5. Difficult Communication in Oncology Nursing: Communication is the foundation of the nurse-patient relationship and strongly influences patient satisfaction, outcomes and costs of care.  Oncology nurses frequently find themselves confronted with challenging clinical situations, which can often lead to difficult conversations and conflict.  The goals of this educational program is to prepare nurses to communicate more effectively when confronted with difficult communication scenarios in oncology.  

Presentation Materials

Continuing Nurse Education Materials

  • CNE application instructions (6 documents – pdf and word):

 6. Leadership: Every nurse is a leader. Join your fellow chapter members to explore the meaning of leadership in nursing, assess your own leadership abilities, and create a plan for where you want to go in your profession and career.

Presentation Materials:

Continuing Nurse Education Materials:


7. Incorporating Physical Therapy into Cancer Care: Physical activity has been shown to be the most effective intervention for cancer related fatigue, and can also be useful in managing anxiety, bone loss, cognitive impairment, depression, lymphedema and sleep disturbances.  However, data collected using ONS’ quality measures indicate that fewer than 20% of people with cancer are provided with a physical activity or exercise recommendation.  Nurses have reported being hesitant to recommend physical activity because of a lack of knowledge about making a safe and effective physical activity recommendation and fears of causing harm and liability.  By the end of this program, the attendees will be able to provide physical activity recommendations to people with cancer at low risk for exercise-associated adverse events.

Presentation Materials:

Continuing Nurse Education Materials: